The Loop Emerges. 1964.

Figure Skating Pins Profile: 1964 World Championships

Just shy of a month after the Olympic Winter Games, the 1964 World Figure Skating Championships opened in Dortmund, West Germany, at the Westfalenhallen. Dortmund had previously hosted one major international figure skating event—the 1953 European Championships—so this was the first world figure skating meet held there. The Olympic champions recently crowned in Innsbruck all competed in Dortmund, with only the pairs event seeing a change in gold medalists when the German team of Marika Kilius and Hans-Jürgen Bäumler bested the Russian team of Ludmila and Oleg Protopopov. Perhaps a somewhat controversial result.

Not at all controversial are the figure skating pins made to commemorate the event. A handsome main logo pin in two rich tones of blue enamel marked the occasion. The compulsory figure known as the loop is used as the main visual element, a motif that appeared on several figure skating pins from major events held in Germany. It is one of the earliest known instances of the loop being used as an art element on an event pin.

A handsome main logo pin in two rich tones of blue enamel marked the 1964 World Figure Skating Championships in Dortmund, West Germany.

Along the top of the rectangular pin, which measures approximately 1-1/8″ x 1-11/16″ (2.9 cm x 4.3 cm), is the first portion of the event name and the location: “Weltmeisterschaften, Dortmund.” Separating the words is a line illustration of the Westfalenhallen façade. This is one of only a handful of pins from a major figure skating event to feature the venue. Tucked into the loops of the figure, the larger areas of which are filled in a lighter blue than the background, are the year and the remainder of the event name: “1964, im Eiskunstlaufen und Eistanzen.” Within the small loop is an illustration of a globe, representing the worldwide aspect of the competition. The pin is on a silver-color base metal, with the lettering being the same. An overall pleasing design balance is seen, although the globe element is slightly oversized for the space and competes a bit with the illustration of the venue.

Along with the main logo pin, a series of special-issue pins also were produced, with examples shown in the gallery. Using the same main logo pin but applied to a larger, decorative base with a laurel leaf border, the special-issue pins are:

  • ISU Delegate (“ISU”)
  • Competitor (“Teilnehmer”)
  • Official (“Offizieller”)
  • Press (“Presse”)

Each of the pins carries a color-coded designation beneath the main logo area and measures approximately 1-1/4″ x 1-13/16″ (3.2 cm x 4.6 cm). The Competitor pin, with a rich red background in the designation area, is particularly eye-catching. Of note is that the ISU pin is on a gold-colored base metal while the others are on the same silver-color base metal as the main logo pin. Each of these pins would have been made in limited number, and it is possible that other versions were produced, perhaps for judges, referees, organizing committee members, and others. If you have a pin for sale or trade from this event not shown here, contact The Netropolitan. We’re always interested in acquiring new pins.

Enjoy this week’s figure skating pins blog: The Loop Emerges. 1964.

  • Copyright-protected image. Do not download or use without express written consent of the copyright holder.
  • Copyright-protected image. Do not download or use without express written consent of the copyright holder.
  • Copyright-protected image. Do not download or use without express written consent of the copyright holder.
  • Copyright-protected image. Do not download or use without express written consent of the copyright holder.
  • Copyright-protected image. Do not download or use without express written consent of the copyright holder.

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