It’s a Ligature. 1973.

The pin made to mark the 1973 U.S. Figure Skating Championships, held in Minneapolis–St. Paul, Minnesota, has an all-American look. On a silver-color base metal, red, white, and blue enamels dominate the center pin design that includes a representation of the U.S. flag, a skate boot and blade, and the year, "73."

Of Simpler Times. 1959.

This ribbon from the 1959 U.S. Figure Skating Championships is from the estate of Bill Hickox, who, with his pair skating partner and sister, Laurie, and the entire U.S. figure skating team—and 71 others—perished on February 15, 1961, when Sabena Airlines Flight #548 crashed in Brussels, Belgium, en route to the 1961 World Figure Skating Championships scheduled for Prague, Czechoslovakia.

One and Done (So Far). 1970.

Contested at the then-new Tulsa Assembly Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the 1970 U.S. Figure Skating Championships is the only national championship to date to be hosted by the Sooner State. One and done, it seems. But it was in Tulsa, now more than 50 years ago, that one of the sport’s greatest and most iconic champions, Janet Lynn, claimed the second of her five consecutive national titles.

In the Adirondacks. 1965.

With a long and storied history of hosting major winter sports events—from speed skating to skiing to hockey to bobsledding to figure skating—Lake Placid, New York, rolled out the red carpet in mid-February for the nation's premiere figure skating event, the 1965 U.S. Figure Skating Championships.

In the Middle. 1985.

Like other figure skating pins that commemorated U.S. events in the 1970s and 1980s, a decidedly patriotic motif was used for the main logo pin from the 1985 U.S. Figure Skating Championship pin. A flag in red and white defines the diminutive pin.